the-d-wave-2x-quantum-computer-technology-overview

The Quantum Computing Era Has Begun

The D-Wave 2X™ Quantum Computer Technology Overview

D-Wave Systems builds the world’s first and only commercial quantum computers. The scientists, engineers and executives working there are among the many people who have contributed to this historic achievement…  D-Wave is the recognized leader in the development, fabrication, and integration of superconducting quantum computers. Our systems are being used by world-class organizations and institutions including Lockheed-Martin, Google, NASA, and USC. D-Wave has been granted over 100 US patents and has published over 60 peer-reviewed papers in leading scientific journals.

Watch this video below to see the introduction of the latest edition the D-Wave 2X™

 

Here are some of the faces and stories behind the company…

Quantum Computing and D-Wave Overview – 3:22 minute video

Source: D-Wave Systems from D-Wave Systems on Vimeo.

 

If you want to watch a more in depth webinar you can watch the Introduction to Quantum Computing and D-Wave using the link here. The 30 minute webinar recording will introduce you to quantum computing and D-Wave…

Here’s what someone said about the webinar in the comment section: “This greatly helped to explain many things in detail about D-wave and quantum computing. Keep up the good work!”

To see all the latest videos from D-Wave Systems on Vimeo click here… In the next section below you’ll see the 4 key features about the latest D-Wave 2X™ Systems which are pretty interesting, there are videos below each section I recommend you to watch.

 


The Quantum Computer

  • Exploits quantum mechanical effects
  • Built around “qubits” rather than “bits”
  • Operates in an extreme environment
  • Enables quantum algorithms to solve very hard problems

Source: D-WAVE TWO™ SYSTEM: Quantum Computing from D-Wave Systems on Vimeo.

 

Power and Cooling

  • “The Fridge” is a closed cycle dilution refrigerator
  • The superconducting processor generates no heat
  • Cooled to 180x colder than interstellar space (0.015 Kelvin)

Source: D-WAVE TWO™ SYSTEM: Power and Cooling from D-Wave Systems on Vimeo.

 

A Unique Processor Environment

  • Shielded to 50,000× less than Earth’s magnetic field
  • In a high vacuum: pressure is 10 billion times lower than atmospheric pressure
  • 192 i/o and control lines from room temperature to the chip
  • “The Fridge” and servers consume just 25kW of power
  • Power demand won’t increase as it scales to thousands of qubits

Source: D-WAVE TWO™ SYSTEM: Unique Processor Environment from D-Wave Systems on Vimeo.

 

Processing with D-Wave

  • A lattice of 1000 tiny superconducting circuits, known as qubits, is chilled close to absolute zero to get quantum effects
  • A user models a problem into a search for the “lowest point in a vast landscape”
  • The processor considers all possibilities simultaneously to determine the lowest energy required to form those relationships
  • Multiple solutions are returned to the user, scaled to show optimal answers

Source: D-WAVE TWO™ SYSTEM: Processing with D-Wave from D-Wave Systems on Vimeo.

 

D-Wave Systems quotes on Software

Just as the classical computer world needed a software ecosystem to spur usage and development, quantum computers do as well. At D-Wave we are starting to develop the layers of “system software” that will make it easy for customers and collaborators to use the system and exploit its strengths.

Software Architecture

The D-Wave 2X System has a web API with client libraries available for C, C++, Python and MATLAB. This interface allows the machine to be easily accessed as a cloud resource over a network. Using development tools and client libraries, users can write code in the language of their choice.

The D-Wave software architecture is in the early stages of development. This picture depicts the architecture, with future items indicated by italics.

 

d-wave-sw-4

 

Programming a quantum computer is different than programming a traditional computer. To program the system, the user maps a problem into a search for the “lowest point in a vast landscape,” which corresponds to the best possible outcome. The processor considers all the possibilities simultaneously to determine the lowest energy required to form those relationships. Because a quantum computer is probabilistic rather than deterministic, the computer returns many very good answers in a short amount of time – 10,000 answers in one second. This gives the user not only the optimal solution or a single answer, but also other alternatives to choose from.

Users can submit problems to the system in a number of different ways, as described below. Values corresponding to the “weights” of the qubits and coupling “strengths” of the interaction between them are submitted to the system, which then executes a single Quantum Machine Instruction (QMI) for processing. Up to about 1000 weights and about 3000 strengths can be specified, reflecting the number of qubits and the number of connections in the current D-Wave 2X 1000 qubit processor.

The solutions are values that correspond to the optimal configuration of qubits found, or the lowest points in the energy landscape. These values are returned to the user program over the network. USers can specify the number of solutions they want the system to return.

There are multiple ways to engage the system:

Use a higher level program in C, C++, Fortran or Python to create and execute a Quantum Machine Instruction.

Use one of the D-Wave tools under development including:

  • QSage, a translator designed for optimization problems
  • ToQ, a High Level Language translator used for constraint satisfaction problems and designed to let users “speak” in the language of their problem domain.
    Directly program the system by using Quantum Machine Language to issue the Quantum Machine Instruction.

Download this white paper to learn more about the programming model for a D-Wave system.

The D-Wave customer service can be found here, that is something you can read on their site if you want to but it’s not really related to what I wanted to cover today in this blog post update.

 


You might also want to read the Tutorials in the Background Reading Series

I’ve only put the table of contents sections below and linked it all to their website to make it easy for you to find all information linking to the right places in one blog post… Below this section there are some more videos and the 17 minute video is the first one you’re gonna see which I urge you to watch if you have the time because the founder Geordie Rose is on stage in the TEDx Talk video talking about what’s already possible and he makes a few dangerous predictions about the future and those are pretty scary if you think about it.

Quantum Computing Primer

This tutorial is intended to introduce the concepts and terminology used in Quantum Computing, to provide an overview of what a Quantum Computer is, and why you would want to program one.

Contents

SECTION 1

1.1 – Conventional computing
1.2 – A new kind of computing
1.3 – The light switch game
1.4 – How does quantum mechanics help?

SECTION 2

2.1 – It’s a math expression – who cares?
2.2 – The energy program
2.3 – Quantum computers can LEARN
2.4 – A computer that programs itself
2.5 – Uncertainty is a feature

The material is written using very high level concepts and is designed to be accessible to both technical and non-technical audiences. Some background in physics, mathematics and programming is useful to help understand the concepts presented in this document, although this is not a requirement.

What you will learn

By following through the material in this primer, you will learn:

  1. How quantum physics gives us a new way to compute
  2. The similarities and differences between quantum computing and classical computing
  3. How the fundamental units of quantum computing (qubits) are manipulated to solve hard problems
  4. Why Quantum Computing is well suited to AI and machine learning applications, and how quantum computers may be used as ‘AI co-processors’

 

How D-Wave processors are built, and how they use the physics of spin systems to implement quantum computation

Contents

SECTION 1: Inside the processor

1.1 – The building blocks of QC
1.2 – A fabric of programmable elements
1.3 – Support circuitry: Addressing, programming and reading the qubits
1.4 – Manufacturing quantum processors

SECTION 2: Outside the processor

2.1 – The processor packaging
2.2 – Computer cooling
2.3 – Computer shielding and wiring
2.4 – Computer form factor
2.5 – Cloud based access

SECTION 3

3.1 – The future of the hardware

 

Additional Material:

 

Media Coverage:

time-magazine

time-the-infinity-machine

FEB 6, 2014 TIME Time: The Quantum Quest for a Revolutionary Computer D-Wave was featured on the cover of Time Magazine, with an extensive article accompanying it. Click here to read the summary.

 

wired-magazine

wired-the-age-of-quantum-computing-has-almost-arrived

MAY 21, 2014 WIRED Wired: The Age of Quantum Computing Has (Almost) Arrived “Google owns a lot of computers—perhaps a million servers stitched together into the fastest, most powerful artificial intelligence on the planet. But last August, Google teamed up with NASA to acquire what may be the search giant’s most powerful piece of hardware yet. It’s certainly the strangest.” Read the Wired feature story on D-Wave here.

 


The D-Wave Systems company has a common passion and a simple mission

That is to integrate new discoveries in physics, engineering, manufacturing, and computer science into breakthrough approaches to computation to help solve some of the world’s most challenging computing problems. To do so, we’ve brought together a leadership team with unparalleled experience in business, science and technology.

Geordie Rose is the founder and CTO of D-Wave Systems. He is known as a leading advocate for quantum computing and physics-based processor design, and has been invited to speak on these topics in venues ranging from TED and Tedx events to industry, scientific and executive conferences. Dr. Rose holds a PhD in theoretical physics from the University of British Columbia, specializing in quantum effects in materials. While at McMaster University, he graduated first in his class with a BEng in Engineering Physics, specializing in semiconductor engineering. Dr. Rose writes regularly on the blog Hack the Multiverse.

The next video is about 17 minutes and I really recommend you to watch the first video because he explains some details about what they can do with the quantum computers and he makes a few dangerous predictions which is pretty scary stuff if you think about it…

 

Source: ideacity

 

D-Wave Systems quoted on Software

 

“Just as the classical computer world needed a software ecosystem to spur usage and development, quantum computers do as well. At D-Wave we are starting to develop the layers of ‘system software’ that will make it easy for customers and collaborators to use the system and exploit its strengths.”

 

Software Architecture

The D-Wave 2X System has a web API with client libraries available for C, C++, Python and MATLAB. This interface allows the machine to be easily accessed as a cloud resource over a network. Using development tools and client libraries, users can write code in the language of their choice.

The D-Wave software architecture is in the early stages of development. This picture depicts the architecture, with future items indicated by italics.

This TEDx Talks video below explains you what the dangerous part of quantum computing is because we’re already able to change everything by programming a new reality…

 

Computer science is one of the worst things to happen to computers or to science” said Neil Gerschenfeld at TED 2006.

 

In this TEDx CERN talk, Gerschenfeld elaborates on how computer science, unlike physics, has arbitrarily segregated the notion that computing happens in an alien world. He talks about breaking down barriers between the digital and physical worlds, and gives us a glimpse of a revolution that could change the way our economy works. Neil Gerschenfeld is the director of MIT’s Center for Bits and Atoms, a lab that breaks down boundaries between digital and physical worlds, from creating molecular quantum computers to virtuosic musical instruments. He started Fab Lab, a global network that allows people access to prototype tools for personal fabrication. He also directs Fab Academy, an associated program for distributed research and education in digital fabrication.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.

 

Source: TEDx Talks

 


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Ricardo Penders

Computers and Gadgets is what I'm really passionate about and because of my 20+ years of coding experience most technical stuff is easy for me to understand and I'm able to save a lot of time and money because of it but I didn't have any way to share that with people and pass on some of my knowledge.

That's why I started this blog... Coding and building websites is almost the same thing and I really love to experiment with code on my websites and share that with people online. This is how I started with Internet Marketing.

Now I'm teaching what I'm doing here on my website and would love to add your success story to my website.

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